Buildings

This page is under research and construction

St Mary's Church

Articles relating to the Parish Church can be found here. The building is well documented in the Book "Woodford juxta Thrapston" and also in a brief guide available from the Church.

Articles include

"The Great Restoration"

"Message from the Past" - Time Capsule letter discovered 1995

The Old Rectory

To follow

The Masons Arms

Elizabeth Fletcher in 1891 lived here post mistress census - more to follow

The Dukes Arms

The Duke’s Arms Public House is certainly the longest licensed premise in Woodford and most probably the oldest. Woodford juxta Thrapston book suggests it could have originally been called “The Queen’s Head” in its early days. The property was classed as an “Inn” which by definition would have offered food, alcohol and stabling. The stables were on the right hand side of the present car park entrance and can be seen on the photograph of the War Memorial unveiling continued.

The Prince of Wales

To follow

Temperance Hall

To follow

Primary School

The present village school opened in September 1974 on the former village recreation ground which had been donated to the Parish Council by Mr Plevins of Woodford House. The land was purchased by the County Council under a compulsory purchase order in the late 1960s. The school was designed by Mr Terry Franklin and constructed by Marriotts of Rushden in 1973 / 1974. The school was extended in 2007, the architect once again being Mr Franklin. Much of the cost of the was met by a village benefactor, the late Mr Fritz Munkelt in memory of his late wife, Amelia Munkelt nee Wilkinson.

The White Horse

The former White Horse Inn between Bakers Lane and Club Lane is a substantial building with a series of barns (now converted to living accomodation) on the Baker's Lane boundary. The lintel of the forrmer doors are visible in the gable end and window openings onto Baker's Lane were clearly evident until the building was recently re-pointed. The main part of the property was rebuilt in the early 1870s and the event is described in the Northampton Mercury  of 29 November 1873 - "The White Horse pubic house having been rebuilt, Mr Thomas Talbut the landlord gave the workmen a dinner on Friday 21st November. Mr Beeby the worthy host of the house, who is in his 75th year was at the head of the table. After dinner the health of Mr Talbut was drunk with cheers as well as that of the host. In the evening the ringers rang some peals with the handbells and singing helped the company pass a merry evening."

The (Steam) Engine

The Engine pub in the High Street was first licensed on 10 July 1867, and the licensee was Mr Zachariah Gunn (b Denford). Mr Gunn remained landlord of the premises until July 1915 when Mr Lewis Coe took over. The pub was primarily an ironworkers pub and was frequented by many of the quarry and furnace men who lived in that part of the village. continued

The Coach and Horses